Schwere gustav. German Artillery

Firing the 80 cm Railway Gun 'Schwerer Gustav'

schwere gustav

The barrel was then fitted into the cradle and the whole assembly hoisted up and lowered onto the mounting. Hitler inspects the big gun during testing. This led to decreased usage of the 420 mm Big Bertha howitzers. This mortar was the biggest in the world, but it was also never used in combat. He conceived the idea of a really big cannon, Schwerer Gustav. But only Gustav saw action in the battlefield.

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Schwerer Gustav

schwere gustav

Gustav began its assault on the Soviet fortifications of Sevastopol, lobbing 4. It is made of bronze and is actually a piece of art. The desired specification was that the cannons should be able to destroy 1-meter thick layers of steel or 7-meter thick walls of reinforced concrete. But the destiny unfolded otherwise. In terms of caliber, Gustav and Dora were surpassed by only two other guns—the British Mallet's Mortar made in 1857 and the American Little David made during the Second World War both of which are 914 mm.

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80 cm Gustav Railway Gun

schwere gustav

According to Wikipedia, Schwerer Gustav weighed in at around 1350 tonnes and was capable of firing 4. The eventual product was a 1,350 metric ton, 800mm long-barreled cannon, capable of firing bunker-busting and high-explosive ammunition with rocket projectiles envisaged , mounted on a special 47-metre railway gun-carriage running on double railway tracks. Their main body was made of chrome-nickel steel that was fitted with an aluminum alloy ballistic nose cone. It took 4 days to assemble the 5 principal components of the artillery, and fit them into working posture. This may not be true. The Japanese surrendered before its deployment. Its very existence would have made for great propaganda and morale boost to axis forces.

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German Artillery

schwere gustav

With 7-ton concrete-piercing shells a range of 23 miles was achieved, and one such shell is reported to have penetrated 100-foot of earth before detonating inside an underground ammunition store. Thus, the gun could fire only 14 rounds in a day. One such shell was reported as penetrating 100 feet into the earth before detonating in an underground ammunition store. It was to aid the German Army in penetrating the Maginot Line. Formal acceptance trials of the gun were conducted at the Rügenwald Proving Ground with Hitler in attendance in the spring of 1941.

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The UnMuseum: Schwerer Gustav

schwere gustav

In either case, Krupp took a gamble and set his design team to work on a concept model for the weapon. Schwerer Gustav was instead deployed on the Eastern Front at Sevastopol in Russia during its siege in 1942. Seven guns were built, six of which saw combat between 1941 and 1945. In the 1930's as Hitler eyed up an eventual invasion of France, he saw a problem. The Germans designed this piece of artillery to prepare for the Battle of France.

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The UnMuseum: Schwerer Gustav

schwere gustav

At that location they constructed a set of curved double tracks on which the gun could be assembled. The British built a huge 42-tonne gun that could fire 914 mm exploding shells over 4km. The attack was cancelled, however, and the heavy gun was never used again. Each gun had to be accompanied by a crane, a heavy transport trailer, and several modified tanks to carry shells. After five weeks of positioning the device, a feat that required 4,000 men, the weapon was ready. However, Gustav was a railway gun or rifle.

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